Friday, May 30, 2014

Sheepy Stuff

How many sheep can you see at the Massachusetts Sheep and Woolcraft Fair?

At the Mass. Sheep and Woolcraft Fair

I didn't count, but my impression was "lots." Sheep not yet shorn, sheep being shorn (and baaing loudly), sheep already shorn and wearing jackets.

At the Mass. Sheep and Woolcraft Fair

At the Mass. Sheep and Woolcraft Fair

Sheep who were curious about passersby with iPads and sheep who were indifferent.

At the Mass. Sheep and Woolcraft Fair

At the Mass. Sheep and Woolcraft Fair

At the Mass. Sheep and Woolcraft Fair

Sheep being judged—by what criteria, I don't know—I admit to being rather clueless about sheep. I also admit to being a bad blogger that day, as I took very few photos. I wasn't in the mood for documenting—I just wanted to drink in the sights and sounds. 

There were also bunnies—beautiful, amusing bunnies!

At the Mass. Sheep and Woolcraft Fair

And, of course, there was an infinite variety of yarn from New England farms and indie dyers. But please sit down before you read the next part ... I didn't buy any! These days I have plenty of yarn and I'm not adding to my stash unless I have a particular project I am ready to cast on. I'm not going so far as to join a yarn diet group on Ravelry or anything like that, but I am exercising restraint.

I had a nice chat with Karin of Periwinkle Sheep—she and her yarns were at the Sliver Moon Farm booth. (Another blogging fail: I didn't get a picture of her.) But, I brought my current sock design-in-progress to show Karin. I'm knitting them in Periwinkle Sheep Watercolors in the Gold Rush colorway.

Sock Design in Progress

Sock Design in Progress

Sock #2 is cast on and I've got a model and a tech editor lined up, so look for the pattern sometime in June.

My main reason for going to the fair was to take a drop spindle workshop with Ashley Flagg. It was terrific! She was so well prepared, knowledgeable, and patient. If you ever get a chance to take one of her classes at WEBS, don't hesitate—you'll be glad you did.

Here's my very first effort at spinning:

Spinning Beginnings

Spinning Beginnings

Now I might have a new craft obsession. I've been doing a little spinning every day, working with both carded and combed roving.

Spinning Beginnings

Ashley said the Golding spindle my sister Jenny gave me is "the Cadillac of spindles." I had no idea! It will be a long time before my efforts are worthy of this beautifully made spindle, but it's definitely making all my practicing enjoyable.

Spinning Beginnings

So I've fallen down the rabbit hole, I guess, armed now with a lovely spindle, two kinds of roving, a Maggie Casey DVD, and Judith MacKenzie McCuin's The Intentional Spinner.

Spinning Beginnings

I feel more challenged by spinning than by any other craft I've tried. Maybe even more challenged than I was by learning French in my 40s. There are moments when I have to stop and consider obvious things, things that I would expect to do on autopilot, like asking—is this counter-clockwise or clockwise?  It's humbling. And yet—just like when I took my first yoga class and could not understand how people were doing Tree without falling over—I feel compelled to keep at it.

Have you ever felt humbled by a craft? How did it work out?

I hope you have a lovely weekend!

3 comments:

Jenny Sennott said...

Yes, you have fallen down the rabbit hole, but it is a good one.

Sari said...

Want. Those. Socks. I have yarn ready if you want testers! ;-)

Jane said...

I like the look of those socks. I'll be waiting for the pattern release.