Sunday, April 24, 2016

Triple Happiness: Yarn Over KAL, Lace Sale, and Giveaway

The Yarn Over KAL starts today! Will you join us? We've got some great prizes, including pretty yarns and an eye pillow from my Etsy shop (the winner gets to choose which design they'd like). It continues through May 29, so there's plenty of time to knit something large or small. You can cast on anytime between now and then.

For this KAL, I'm working on two different projects. One is a new design, an asymmetrical lace shawl that I'm knitting in Louet Gems fingering:

Lace, daffodils, rushing river: my weekend is off to a good start. How's yours? #bluepeninsula #knitting #knittersofinstagram #knitstagram #igknitters

It's coming along nicely and, fingers crossed, the pattern should be available before the KAL ends. The other project is a new sample of my Streusel scarf, which I just cast on this morning. The Periwinkle Sheep merino/silk that I first designed Streusel with has been discontinued, so this time around I'm using a brand-new yarn. It's a fingering weight merino/yak/nylon blend from Periwinkle Sheep that's wonderfully soft and seems perfectly suited for lace—it blocks out beautifully and has a lovely drape. This new yarn isn't in her Etsy shop yet, but Karin has announced on Facebook that some of it will be available at her open house next weekend.

Streusel Start

I'm excited to be going back to an older pattern and knitting it again. I love that Streusel is completely reversible—there's no right or wrong side to worry about when you're wearing it. And the gentle shaping really appeals to me. The increases and decreases are spaced so that it grows in width (and then narrows again after the center point) very gradually. The end result is a light scarf rather than a bulky shawl—just right for spring and summer.

Streusel and my other lace patterns—not just scarves and shawls but socks, sweaters, hats, and mitts, too—are on sale through midnight tonight in my Ravelry pattern store. Save 20% on individual patterns with the coupon code YARNOVER (you can use the code as many times as you like).

Now . . .  on to the giveaway promised in the title of this post! This is an old-fashioned blog giveaway where all you have to do is leave a comment on this post (no liking or sharing or tagging on other social media required). Just answer the question: When you knit lace (or any kind of stitch pattern), which do you prefer to work from—charts or line-by-line written instructions? What makes you like one option better than the other?

Two winners will each receive a hand-embroidered lavender-chamomile sachet and a couple of cute owl stitch markers from Lavender Hill Knits. Lavender is a natural moth repellant—I keep sachets all over the house, in every closet, drawer, basket, or bin that contains wool. I've added a vintage lace ribbon so you can hang the sachet in a closet or anywhere you'd like a fresh herbal scent.

Blog Giveaway Prizes

Blog Giveaway Prizes

Blog Giveaway Prizes

Leave your comment by Friday, April 29. I'll announce the winners next weekend. Please include your Ravelry username or email in your comment so I can get in touch with you if you are a winner. 

Blog Giveaway Prizes

Good luck and happy knitting!

39 comments:

shipstondesigns said...

If forced to choose I'd go with written instructions, but honestly I prefer if both are included. I want a chart to give me feel for how the pattern should be looking, and quick reference, and written instructions for clarification.

Caitlin Bradley said...

Charts! With few exceptions. I like being able to "see" what the goal is. I'm also super visual in general so it's not like this is surprising for me. If I'm given written instructions you can guarantee I'm charting in my own. Exceptions for me are really tiny not quite lace bits, those don't necessarily need a chart.

Kattis said...

If the lace is complicated, I tend to prefer written instructions so I can read out each stitch as I work the pattern.
If the lace is more repetetive and easier (not so many different stitches) I like to work from charts, as they then serve as a reminder of the pattern.

Katarina (xplaka on Ravelry)

busgirl said...

Charts all the way for me! I turn them into a song and sing to myself while I knit! I am loving your wheels. Adrienne (busgirl on Rav)

Robin Barraud said...

I love using line by line instructions especially when doing lace. Sometimes in lace patterns there's so many different stitches and I can't remember what all the symbols stand for and then I have to look them up. It feels like I'm doing double the work. Your work is absolutely beautiful!
Ravelry - robinsroostme

K said...

Charts are easier for me, but some written instructions to help me at the start are helpful.

nordling on Ravelry.

Anonymous said...

Great question! Mostly I prefer a chart. If the pattern is complex, I use the written instructions to study and learn the pattern. Then the words and visualness of the pattern take on their own rhythm in my hands.
Have been enjoying the evolution of your Stitch Journal!
Lynn (Moondance105 on Rav)

kelley said...

I like to use written directions, but that really is only because I am too chicken to try the charts. Thank you for the discount on your patterns. Can't wait to cast on 'biscuit' for the KAL.
Kelley (kelleyd67 on Ravelry)

Gini said...

I've found that charts are easier for me to glance at and quickly find my place. Reading the written out instructions takes longer, and it's harder for me to visualize what I'm doing. Although, I do love when both are provided because I like being able to cross reference! Sometimes that's really helpful.

I've loved following you on Instagram (I'm @birbinia) and now I'm really looking forward to following your blog too!

Debbieamy said...

I usually use charts, but I like having line by line instructions available as well in case the charts are not clear. That is usually not the case, but I have had that experience. I love Periwinkle Sheep yarn.

Sara said...

I'm excited for this KAL! I have a strong preference for charted lace patterns. My knitting style is a bit unconventional, and sometimes when I knit lace from written directions, decreases end up slanting the wrong way.

Sara (silkworm77 on Ravelry)

Papisbaby said...

Papisbaby on Rabelry.
I like charts best .I color the charts to help the pattern easier to remember for pattern repeats.

Lisa Stewart said...

I overwhelmingly prefer charts to written instructions. If there is something unique or very complicated, written instructions allow me to check my understanding, but are not necessary. I am a visual learner and can often 'picture' the page layout, when recalling information.

finnknitter on Ravelry

Kate said...

Such a good question! One I've been actually thinking about lately as I could never read charts until just recently and it was like the written instructions just blurred together and the charts became so clear and obvious! So I think I'm a chart girl!! I think it's because I'm a visual/physical learner, I need to be able to see how the sts will work out to be able to get it and memorize it.

Kate said...

Oh shoot! I forgot to leave my rav name: the comment about being a visual/physical learner is from Kate or KathrynMichael on rav :)

Mary-Anne said...

Generous giveaway! I definitely prefer charts - I can 'see' the lace pattern before I knit. (thelaceeater on Rav)

craftsonthego said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
ikkinlala said...

I generally prefer charts because I find it easier to find my place again if I look away from my knitting when I'm using charts.

ikkinlala AT yahoo DOT ca

susan said...

I prefer charts, but like to have written instruction for clarification or if I make a mistake. I am a bif fan od stitch markers and lifelines as well. Thanks for the opportunity to enter your drawing. SitkaSusan on Ravelry

Shelda said...

Oh, charts, definitely! I'm fascinated by the new ways to represent the stitches: Techknitter's chart-charts, and JC Briar's Stitch maps. Sort of like mega-charts :) I do occasionally refer to written instructions to confirm or check a point, but I'm much more comfortable with the visual representation.

Lovely sachets, and those owl stitch markers are adorable!

Txtaurus said...

Charts, although on complicated charts it is nice to have written for clarifications.

Anonymous said...

I love charts. I print them out and then I like to use highlighter markers on the different stitches. That way I can just glance down and see the different colors. I always use the same color each time for all of the special stitches. I have seen charts that it's hard to tell the difference between a k2tog and a ssk, and other stitches are hard to see clearly (not Bonnie's charts. Her's are very clear), so seeing the colors let me know right away without having to reference the key.
I hope to have my Streusel up and running (& finished) for this KAL, but I am in the middle of a move. It will get knit, whether I am able to do it in the time allotted or not. I loved making it the first time (I no longer own it. It is being loved by a family member). This next one is for me!
Coga on Ravelry

Anonymous said...

I prefer charts, though I also find it helpful to have the written directions there, too. I find that if I read the directions first it helps when I follow the charts as I knit.
BlissKnitter on Ravelry

Roopali said...

When I started knitting lace, I wrote out the charts but after a while this became so hard to follow I started working from the charts. Now I can't imagine not using charts - love them!

Judy said...

Charts. I find them to be much faster (but I do keep the Legend close by for reference if it's a complicated design).

Lori S said...

Charts. Once I learned how to read them there was no going back. It's so much quicker to knit without finding my place between the words of each written round. And it's easier to understand the pattern to see how the rows stack up against each other, which is pretty helpful for when I inevitably make a mistake!

Connie K. said...

Line by line instructions. I'm one of the unlucky people who can't seem to get charts. I have to write out patterns if I want to knit something that is only charted. Thanks for the lovely giveaway!

greyowl (Ravelry id)

Sally said...

Hands down: written instructions. I can usually,eventually get with the chart program. Sometimes, if a pattern offers both, I switch to the chart after I have the line-by-line instructions sorted out. But if I have only a chart, I typically have to try/frog/write out/try again. Hope this helps. Lovely giveaway! Thanks for the inspiration and the chance to win!

Lori S said...

Oops. Forgot to add my id: sweetie41 on Ravelry.

tre12vor said...

I literally jumped from using charts for cross stitch right into knitting lace from charts (ignorance is bliss), so I prefer charts as they show what the design is supposed to look like and I always color code my charts before I start knitting from them for easier reference (a throw back from my cross stitch days). Still, having the written instructions to refer to is always helpful. Cute little owls!

lindalina on Ravelery

Betsy said...

I mostly prefer charts but find it helpful to have the written instructions as back up in case there's something that's unclear to me in the chart. My Rav ID: westiegrrl. Thanks for the contest!

Jenn said...

I'm a chart girl! This surprises me because I love written instructions. I tried a chart after watching several podcasts and the chart just made so much sense to me. I find it easier to keep my place in the pattern. Ravelry name - bluekneep

Polly said...

Charts! I get lost in long written instructions for lace. The sachets are lovely!

PollyPuur on Ravelry

Polly said...

Oops! Typo. I'm PollyPurr on Ravelry, not PollyPuur.

Anonymous said...

It's Charts for me too. I find it to hard to focus my eyes on written instructions. Sometimes I like to be able to see on the WS if I am at the correct corresponding stitch from the RS. That's easier with a chart too.

What a lovely idea to organize this price draw. Thanks!

Wednesday195 on Ravelry.

Fanny said...

Definitely charts, they seem more simple to me as I can visualize what is going on not only on the particular row I am working on but also on any row before or after, it helps me align my work better. But it is just a personal preference
FannyKaplan on Ravelry

Fanny said...

My personal preference is to use charts. This allows me to visualize not only what is going on on a specific row I am working on but also what is going on "before" and "after" as well.

Fanny said...

Charted instructions work better for me, they allow me to better visualize what is going on at any specific place in my work

noreen said...

I am actually knitting my first pattern that has chart and written. I have only used written before so it is kind of fun to try something new. I liked the written to start but then I tried the chart and have been using it the last few days. Truthfully I like having both but that might be because I have only been using a chart for less than a week